Honesty, Clarity, and Action



My friend, Justin Jackson, wrote an article about the potential pitfalls of following in your heroes’ footsteps. He writes:

As creators, there’s a temptation to seek out our heroes and ask them how they achieved their success. We think if we follow their instructions, we’ll be able to reproduce their winning magic.

Justin goes on to make some excellent points. We can’t follow in the footsteps of our heroes because the path has changed since they first took it. Also, their personality is different than ours. So too their circumstances — perhaps they were single with no kids when they started their company, or perhaps they were 65 when they got started.

However, there are mindsets and lifestyle commitments that we can emulate. What where the underlying principles that led them to be consistent, focused, and successful?

I think we could sum it up thusly:

A commitment to honesty and clarity with a bias toward action.

  1. A Commitment to Honesty and Clarity. This means we don’t shy away from the truth of who we want to be, where we are, where we want to go, what capacity we hold, what we want to build, and how we will build it. Don’t shy away from being honest with yourself and finding clarity about your vision, values, goals, and resources.


  2. A Bias Toward Action: This is doing the work. Showing up every day. Focusing on what’s important but not necessarily urgent. Getting things done.

If you’re familiar with Stephen Covey’s 7 Habits, you’ll see that this sums up the first three habits, but especially so the 2nd. The habit of beginning with the end in mind is all about the balance between leadership and management.

Covey writes about how things are created twice: first there is the idea and then there is the manifestation of that idea. First we build with our imagination, then we build with our hands. Both stages of “creating” are vital because we need both clarity and action.

Too much focus on ideas and we’ll never do the work. But too much focus on staying busy and we may find ourselves spinning our wheels without making progress or creating anything of value.

* * *

Coming back to Justin’s article about not following in our heroes’ footsteps. It’s true that our heroes have possibly forgotten the exact path they took (because it was 10 or 20 years ago for them), or that the landscape is different now than it was then, or just the fact that we and our heroes are altogether different people with different life circumstances, etc.

And so, when we glean from those whom we look up to, the goal isn’t to peer over their shoulder and peek at their to-do list and their agenda. Rather, we should glean from their values, their approach to problem solving, and their work ethic.

And at the end of the day, I believe we’ll find a common denominator amongst so many of the successful people we look up to. Those who create incredible businesses, who are prolific in their art, who serve others well:

They have a commitment to honesty and clarity, and they have a bias toward action.

* * *

Drilling down a bit further, there are more than a few lists and charts I’ve come across in the reading and study I’ve been doing for The Focus Course. And as I was comparing these lists and charts, two that have stuck out to me are Tony Robbins’ 5 questions as a way to help us with honesty and clarity and then Stephen Covey’s 7 habits as a way to help us with action.

Tony Robbins’ 5 Questions

Marc Benioff’s V2MOM method (Vision, Values, Methods, Obstacles, Measurements) which are based on Tony Robbins’ five questions help us be honest.

  1. What do I really want? (Vision)
  2. What is important about it? (Values)
  3. How will I get it? (Methods)
  4. What is preventing me from having it? (Obstacles)
  5. How will I know I am successful? (Measurements)

Stephen Covey’s 7 Habits

Stephen Covey’s book helps us develop a lifestyle with a bias toward action. The 7 Habits are:

  1. Be Proactive: Taking responsibility and choosing to do something with our life. A commitment to making forward progress — to just getting going. To act instead of be acted on. To cease blaming external circumstances. To be solution oriented. To focus on what we can control and what we can do something about (called our “circle of influence”).



  2. Begin with the End in Mind: Imagination and leadership. Knowing who you want to be and what you wan to do. Also, knowing that vision isn’t enough — we also have to take those ideas and make them a reality. We have to think and act. Plan and do. The need for both leadership and management. 


  3. Put First Things First: Have a bias toward action, but have that action be in line with your vision, values, and doing important work and making progress on meaningful work.


  4. Think Win-Win: Life is not a zero-sum game. We can put others first and serve them without endangering our own goals. Cooperation not competition.


  5. Seek first to understand, then to be understood: It’s important to listen with the intent to understand. Don’t be selfish or narcissistic. (This is what Dale Carnegie’s book, How to Win Friends and Influence People, is all about.)


  6. Synergize: We go further together. Two heads are better than one. Teamwork, cooperation, open-mindedness. The differences in our peers, co-workers, and family members should be seen as strengths, not weaknesses.


  7. Sharpen the Saw — Being committed to personal growth and renewal in the four areas of our life: physical, social/emotional, mental, and spiritual.

* * *

As I mentioned above, there are so many lists and methodologies for personal growth and becoming a person who gets things done. None of them are “the only one”. There is no secret potion. Which is why I’ve been trying to see if there’s a common denominator. Is there just a simple concept or idea to keep in the front of mind as we try to stay steady in our pursuit of doing our best creative work?

I think there is. It’s having a commitment to honesty and clarity with a bias toward action.

You’d be hard pressed to find a successful musician, athlete, programmer, designer, writer, singer, or businessman who didn’t have a goal in mind and who didn’t show up every day to practice and work hard.




By the way, I just kicked off The Fight Spot newsletter — my weekly email about creativity, focus, and risk.

If you want to stay in the loop with the creativity and productivity-centric writing I’m doing then joining the email list is one of the best ways to be notified.