Good Taste



It’s crazy, I know, but we finally got around to watching Jiro Dreams of Sushi. And wow.

Though the documentary tells the story of Jiro Ono and his sushi bar, it’s actually not about sushi. Jiro Dreams of Sushi is about art, craft, dedication, and passion.

I read a lot of interviews with creative folk. Sites such as The Great Discontent, and publications such as Offscreen and Insites, are all insatiably fascinating to me. And one of the common themes you find running throughout these interviews has to do with “consumption”. Writers need to read; musicians should listen to music; photographers should get out there and experience the world. Etcetera.

We know that’s true, but why? Why should writers be avid readers? Shouldn’t we be spending our free time writing?

Jiro Ono, perhaps the world’s greatest sushi artist, explains why:

“In order to make delicious food, you must eat delicious food. The quality of ingredients is important, but one must develop a palate capable of discerning good and bad. Without good taste, you can’t make good food. If your sense of taste is lower than that of the customers how will you impress them?”

If you spend all your time only making and never improving your own palate, you’ve placed a ceiling on the quality of work you’ll ever do.

Your homework for the week is to take time out and experience something incredible. Enjoy it and allow it to mold and improve your own taste.